Difference between revisions of "Universe"

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'''Heinlein, Robert A. "Universe."''' ''Astounding'' May 1941. Rpt. as book New York: Dell, 1951. Rpt. ''The Science Fiction Hall of Fame.'' Vol. IIA. Ben Bova, ed. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1973. New York: Avon, 1974. Rpt. with its sequel "Common Sense" as ''Orphans of the Sky''. London: Gollancz, 1963. New York: Berkley, 1970. [[Category: Fiction]]
 
'''Heinlein, Robert A. "Universe."''' ''Astounding'' May 1941. Rpt. as book New York: Dell, 1951. Rpt. ''The Science Fiction Hall of Fame.'' Vol. IIA. Ben Bova, ed. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1973. New York: Avon, 1974. Rpt. with its sequel "Common Sense" as ''Orphans of the Sky''. London: Gollancz, 1963. New York: Berkley, 1970. [[Category: Fiction]]
  
Possibly the definitive story about a generation-starship: a ship whose passengers and/or crew are "men and women, whose families breed, and whose remote descendants eventually reach the destination" (''S. F. Ency.'', "Generation Starships"). The people of "Universe" have forgotten their mission and mistake the spaceship for a world. See in this Category E. Bryant's ''[[Phoenix without Ashes]]'', H. Martinson's ''[[Aniara: A Review of Man in Time and Space|Aniara]]'', K. O'Donnell's ''[[Mayflies]]'', M. Leinster's "[[Proxima Centauri]]," R. J. Sawyer's ''Golden Fleece,'' N. Spinrad's "Riding the Torch," and E. C. Tubb's ''The Space-born''; see under Drama, K.-B. Blomdahl's, ''[[ANIARA (film 2018/2019)|ANIARA]]'', the TV series ''[[The Starlost (television series)|Starlost]]'', and the ''Star Trek'' episode "[[Star Trek, "For the World Is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky"|For the World Is Hollow . . . .]]" Cf. and contrast RAH's later ''Citizens of the Galaxy'' (1957), which Sargent (1988; q.v. under Reference) says features space ships which are sovereign states. [[http://www.clockworks2.org/wiki/index.php?title=Sargent,_Lyman_Tower._British_and_American_Utopian_Literature]] "Universe" is discussed by Wolfe, esp. 61-65, and by H. Bruce Franklin in Robert A. Heinlein, 43-44; see Wolfe under Reference and both under Literary Criticism.[[http://www.clockworks2.org/wiki/index.php?title=Wolfe,_Gary_K._The_Known_and_the_Unknown]]
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Possibly the definitive story about a generation-starship: a ship whose passengers and/or crew are "men and women, whose families breed, and whose remote descendants eventually reach the destination" (''S. F. Ency.'', "Generation Starships"). The people of "Universe" have forgotten their mission and mistake the spaceship for a world. See in this Category E. Bryant's ''[[Phoenix without Ashes]]'', H. Martinson's ''[[Aniara: A Review of Man in Time and Space|Aniara]]'', K. O'Donnell's ''[[Mayflies]]'', M. Leinster's "[[Proxima Centauri]]," R. J. Sawyer's ''[[Golden Fleece]],'' N. Spinrad's "[[Riding the Torch]]," and E. C. Tubb's ''[[The Space-born]]''; see under Drama, K.-B. Blomdahl's opera ''[[Aniara (opera)|Aniara]]'' and at the film [[ANIARA (film 2018/2019)|ANIARA]], the TV series ''[[The Starlost (television series)|Starlost]]'', and the ''Star Trek'' episode "[[Star Trek, "For the World Is Hollow and I Have Touched the Sky"|For the World Is Hollow . . . .]]" Cf. and contrast RAH's later ''Citizens of the Galaxy'' (1957), which Sargent (1988; q.v. under Reference) says features space ships which are sovereign states. [[http://www.clockworks2.org/wiki/index.php?title=Sargent,_Lyman_Tower._British_and_American_Utopian_Literature]] "Universe" is discussed by Wolfe, esp. 61-65, and by H. Bruce Franklin in Robert A. Heinlein, 43-44; see Wolfe under Reference and both under Literary Criticism.[[http://www.clockworks2.org/wiki/index.php?title=Wolfe,_Gary_K._The_Known_and_the_Unknown]]
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For other works cited in this wiki, see here:[https://www.clockworks2.org/wiki/index.php?title=Special:Search&limit=20&offset=20&profile=default&search=generation+starship].
  
  
 
RDE et al. hard-copy; ed. 19May20.
 
RDE et al. hard-copy; ed. 19May20.

Latest revision as of 21:53, 19 May 2020

Heinlein, Robert A. "Universe." Astounding May 1941. Rpt. as book New York: Dell, 1951. Rpt. The Science Fiction Hall of Fame. Vol. IIA. Ben Bova, ed. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1973. New York: Avon, 1974. Rpt. with its sequel "Common Sense" as Orphans of the Sky. London: Gollancz, 1963. New York: Berkley, 1970.

Possibly the definitive story about a generation-starship: a ship whose passengers and/or crew are "men and women, whose families breed, and whose remote descendants eventually reach the destination" (S. F. Ency., "Generation Starships"). The people of "Universe" have forgotten their mission and mistake the spaceship for a world. See in this Category E. Bryant's Phoenix without Ashes, H. Martinson's Aniara, K. O'Donnell's Mayflies, M. Leinster's "Proxima Centauri," R. J. Sawyer's Golden Fleece, N. Spinrad's "Riding the Torch," and E. C. Tubb's The Space-born; see under Drama, K.-B. Blomdahl's opera Aniara and at the film ANIARA, the TV series Starlost, and the Star Trek episode "For the World Is Hollow . . . ." Cf. and contrast RAH's later Citizens of the Galaxy (1957), which Sargent (1988; q.v. under Reference) says features space ships which are sovereign states. [[1]] "Universe" is discussed by Wolfe, esp. 61-65, and by H. Bruce Franklin in Robert A. Heinlein, 43-44; see Wolfe under Reference and both under Literary Criticism.[[2]]

For other works cited in this wiki, see here:[3].


RDE et al. hard-copy; ed. 19May20.