Difference between revisions of "The Jameson Satellite"

From Clockworks2
Jump to navigationJump to search
(Created page with "'''Jones, Neil R. "The Jameson Satellite."''' First of the Professor Jameson series, where John J. Pierce notes "aliens have mated organic brains with robot bodies" ("Retro...")
 
 
(2 intermediate revisions by the same user not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
'''Jones, Neil R. "The Jameson Satellite."'''  
+
'''Jones, Neil R. "The Jameson Satellite."''' Novella ''Amazing'' July 1931. Collected ''Planet of the Double Sun.'' New York: Ace, 1967. Anthologized ''Before the Golden Age''. Isaac Asimov, editor. New York: Doubleday, 1974.
  
 +
On line as a 2008 Project Gutenberg EBook here.[https://www.gutenberg.org/files/26906/26906-h/26906-h.htm] Available in several recent reprints.[https://www.fantasticfiction.com/j/neil-r-jones/jameson-satellite.htm]
  
First of the Professor Jameson series, where John J. Pierce notes "aliens have mated organic brains with robot bodies" ("Retrofitting Humanity," ms, p. 14). Cf. and contrast "Anne McCaffrey’s [[The Ship Who Sang]] (1969) and its sequels, in which human brains are functioning parts of starships."
+
 
 +
First of the Professor Jameson series, where John J. Pierce notes "aliens have mated organic brains with robot bodies" ("Retrofitting Humanity," ms, p. 14). Cf. and contrast "Anne McCaffrey’s ''[[The Ship Who Sang]]'' (1969) and its sequels, in which human brains are functioning parts of starships."
 +
 
 +
Wikipedia entry notes premise of the series and — not quoted — its popularity and influence:
 +
<blockquote>
 +
Jameson was obsessed with the idea of perfectly preserving his body after death and succeeded by having it launched into space in a small capsule. Jameson's body survived for 40,000,000 years, where it was found orbiting a dead planet Earth by a passing Zorome exploration ship. The Zoromes, or machine men as they sometimes called themselves, were cyborgs. They came from a race of biological beings who had achieved immortality by transferring their brains to machine bodies. They occasionally assisted members of other races with this transition (e.g. the Tri-Peds and the Mumes), allowing others to become Zoromes and join them on their expeditions, which sometimes lasted hundreds of years. So, much like the Borg[https://www.clockworks2.org/wiki/index.php?title=Special%3ASearch&search=Borg&go=Go] of the Star Trek series, a Zorome crew could be made up of assimilated members of many different biological species. The Zoromes discovered that Jameson's body had been so well preserved that they were able to repair his brain, incorporate it into a Zorome machine body and restart it
 +
</blockquote>
 +
 
 +
Note also ETs and machine creatures in the novel ''[[2001: A Space Odyssey (novel)|2001: A Space Odyssey]]'' by A. C. Clarke (with Stanley Kubrick), though not in the film.
  
  

Latest revision as of 22:49, 29 June 2020

Jones, Neil R. "The Jameson Satellite." Novella Amazing July 1931. Collected Planet of the Double Sun. New York: Ace, 1967. Anthologized Before the Golden Age. Isaac Asimov, editor. New York: Doubleday, 1974.

On line as a 2008 Project Gutenberg EBook here.[1] Available in several recent reprints.[2]


First of the Professor Jameson series, where John J. Pierce notes "aliens have mated organic brains with robot bodies" ("Retrofitting Humanity," ms, p. 14). Cf. and contrast "Anne McCaffrey’s The Ship Who Sang (1969) and its sequels, in which human brains are functioning parts of starships."

Wikipedia entry notes premise of the series and — not quoted — its popularity and influence:

Jameson was obsessed with the idea of perfectly preserving his body after death and succeeded by having it launched into space in a small capsule. Jameson's body survived for 40,000,000 years, where it was found orbiting a dead planet Earth by a passing Zorome exploration ship. The Zoromes, or machine men as they sometimes called themselves, were cyborgs. They came from a race of biological beings who had achieved immortality by transferring their brains to machine bodies. They occasionally assisted members of other races with this transition (e.g. the Tri-Peds and the Mumes), allowing others to become Zoromes and join them on their expeditions, which sometimes lasted hundreds of years. So, much like the Borg[3] of the Star Trek series, a Zorome crew could be made up of assimilated members of many different biological species. The Zoromes discovered that Jameson's body had been so well preserved that they were able to repair his brain, incorporate it into a Zorome machine body and restart it

Note also ETs and machine creatures in the novel 2001: A Space Odyssey by A. C. Clarke (with Stanley Kubrick), though not in the film.


RDE, with thanks to JJP, 29June20