Difference between revisions of "Henry James and the Media Arts of Modernity"

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The literary feud (1915 and thereabout)[https://lithub.com/25-legendary-literary-feuds-ranked/] between Henry James and H. G. Wells[https://nothingintherulebook.com/2016/03/14/henry-james-vs-h-g-wells-write-off/] was once well known in literary circles and could rouse passions even fairly recently[http://www.bopsecrets.org/rexroth/essays/james-wells.htm] — and we will avoid discussing it. But the existence of the feud can underline how far Henry James and June Hee Chung's book are outside SF and SF criticism, and thereby underline as well the potential usefulness for criticism of finding in James's works concerns that appear in SF, frequently in SF of the 20th century.
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The literary feud (1915 and thereabout)[https://lithub.com/25-legendary-literary-feuds-ranked/] between Henry James and H. G. Wells[https://nothingintherulebook.com/2016/03/14/henry-james-vs-h-g-wells-write-off/] was once well known in literary circles and could rouse passions even fairly recently[http://www.bopsecrets.org/rexroth/essays/james-wells.htm] — and we will avoid discussing it. But the existence of the feud can underline how far Henry James and June Hee Chung's book are outside SF and SF criticism, and thereby underline as well the potential usefulness for criticism of finding in James's works concerns that appear in SF (and elsewhere), and appear with increasing frequency in SF of the 20th century.  
  
RDE, Initial Compiler, 23Dec19 f.  
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Note that a number of James's important works[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_James_bibliography]come in the period between the notable narratives of H. G. Wells's ''[[The Time Machine]]'' (1895) and E. M. Foster's definitive long story, "[[The Machine Stops]]" (1909) — and is succeeded fairly closely by the commercial take-off of US pulp SF with the start of ''Amazing Stories'' (April 1926)[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amazing_Stories] and the appearance of technological themes and images in, e.g., Kafka's "[[In der Strafkolonie]]" ("The Penal Colony," 1919) and D. H. Lawrence, with his concern with "the organic principle" vs. "the inorganic or mechanical principle" in, say, ''Women in Love'' (1920): see the discussion by Joanna G. Semelks of Lawrence and technology in her "[[Sex, Lawrence, and Videotape]]" (and note a somewhat related argument in Richard D. Erlich's "Catastrophism and Coition: Universal and Individual Development in ''Women in Love''," ''Texas Studies in Literature and Language'' 9.1 [Spring 1967]: 117-128).[https://www.jstor.org/stable/40753934?seq=1]
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Both Chung and James use references to mechanisms figuratively, with people figuratively within mechanisms — people up the social and employment scale from Lawrence's miners and other working class workers.
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RDE, Initial Compiler, 23Dec19/13Jan20 f.  
 
[[Category: Background]]
 
[[Category: Background]]
 
[[Category: Literary Criticism]]
 
[[Category: Literary Criticism]]
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[[Category: Fiction]]

Revision as of 18:41, 14 January 2020

TENTATIVE WORKING

Chung, June Hee. Henry James and the Media Arts of Modernity: Commercial Cosmopolitanism. New York and London: Routledge (Taylor & Francis Group), 2019.


The literary feud (1915 and thereabout)[1] between Henry James and H. G. Wells[2] was once well known in literary circles and could rouse passions even fairly recently[3] — and we will avoid discussing it. But the existence of the feud can underline how far Henry James and June Hee Chung's book are outside SF and SF criticism, and thereby underline as well the potential usefulness for criticism of finding in James's works concerns that appear in SF (and elsewhere), and appear with increasing frequency in SF of the 20th century.

Note that a number of James's important works[4]come in the period between the notable narratives of H. G. Wells's The Time Machine (1895) and E. M. Foster's definitive long story, "The Machine Stops" (1909) — and is succeeded fairly closely by the commercial take-off of US pulp SF with the start of Amazing Stories (April 1926)[5] and the appearance of technological themes and images in, e.g., Kafka's "In der Strafkolonie" ("The Penal Colony," 1919) and D. H. Lawrence, with his concern with "the organic principle" vs. "the inorganic or mechanical principle" in, say, Women in Love (1920): see the discussion by Joanna G. Semelks of Lawrence and technology in her "Sex, Lawrence, and Videotape" (and note a somewhat related argument in Richard D. Erlich's "Catastrophism and Coition: Universal and Individual Development in Women in Love," Texas Studies in Literature and Language 9.1 [Spring 1967]: 117-128).[6]


Both Chung and James use references to mechanisms figuratively, with people figuratively within mechanisms — people up the social and employment scale from Lawrence's miners and other working class workers.



RDE, Initial Compiler, 23Dec19/13Jan20 f.